Initial Project Planning

Initial Project Planning

Trying the Long-EZ on for Size . . . 

6-9 March 2011 – After doing a fair amount of research I scrapped the idea of plunking down $19,000 for a Glastar kit in lieu of the Long-EZ Pay as You Build Plan!  I mean, besides, everyone knows that you SAVE money by building your own airplane!  HA!

Being a newbie, I had to know what I could cram on the instrument panel and what (or who) I could cram into the cockpit.

Initial Instrument Panel ViewInsrument Panel Mockup

 

 

 

 

 

But, being a project manager in my job instilled in me some tendencies to plan this thing out a bit.  I’ve seen too many real-world projects fall flat on their face due to failed planning.  And worse yet, I’ve seen havoc wreaked because a majority of project planning was based on assumptions and/or gut instincts.

Having only been around a Long-EZ when I was about 13 years old, I wasn’t exactly sure how the feel would be in the cockpit.  I had been to the airports around the area and hadn’t seen a Long-EZ, so I figured I would quickly build one myself! (Now that’s a plan!) I cut up some OSB flooring sheets to make a mock fuselage.  I didn’t have enough OSB, but after a quick trip to Home Depot I was able to finish my fuselage mockup.

LEZ Fuselage MockupLEZ Fuselage Mockup

My initial fuselage mockup was just a little too short (in length & height).  And more importantly, the stock width seemed just a little too narrow so I widened the fuselage mockup initially by 2 inches.

Initial Fuselage Mockup

Initial fuselage planning

The 2-inch wider fuselage was better, but it actually felt a little too wide.  I played around with different widths and plugged in the number for all the bulkheads to keep the width ratio the same and not mess with the fuselage’s shape.

IMAG0052

Of course to build the fuselage, I had get acquainted with the plans and their layout in fairly short order.

Initial Fuselage Mockup

Initial Fuselage Mockup

I finally settled on a front seat width of 1.4 inches wider than what the plans called for. This width would give me a little more elbow room, but not so much that I felt like I was going crazy on the widening effort.  After having a few buddies try out the back seat–and actually fitting!–I checked the block for the fuselage passing my size test!

So let’s build this puppy!

Recent Posts

Project Update

Hi Folks,

I’m back on the beat with getting some airplane tasks (not build), hangar organization, NC move loads (mainly LEZ and shop toolsand starting back up again with house repairs to get it on the market.

As I communicated in my last few updates, I’ve had a fair number of significant schedule derailments over the past 6 months so I’m now really ready to get all this stuff knocked out and down to NC ASAP.  

You may have noted that I didn’t mention instrument flying training in the above list.  I am leaving that OFF the list until the house is done and on the market.  Just too many distractions and too much required mentally, time-wise and study-wise to try a concurrent attempt at house prepping and instrument flying.  At this point, the house is the definite priority as I do some sideline tasks for the Long-EZ project (instrument panel design, component CAD designs, 3D printing models/parts, etc.) that I can check, confirm & update with each trip down to the hangar.

I’m still moving out as best possible to get this way-protracted move complete and get back on the build!

  1. Chapter 13/22 – Panel Hinge Pin Leave a reply
  2. Chapter 18/22 – 3D Printing Show & Tell Leave a reply
  3. Chapter 18/22 – 3D-Printed Canopy Latch Leave a reply
  4. Tooling up: Need more CNC! Leave a reply
  5. Chapter 22 – Minor panel redesign Leave a reply
  6. Chapter 22 – On-site checks Leave a reply
  7. Chapter 22 – Contactor Mount V2 Leave a reply
  8. Chapter 22 – Starter Contactor Mount Leave a reply
  9. Tooling Up: 3D Printer Leave a reply