Finishing Avionics Bay

Painting Nose Wheel Cover and Avionics Bay

9 May 2018 — Today I spent a good 45 minutes prepping the avionics bay between the panel and F22 bulkhead for paint.

As you can see, I eventually just created a large box by sealing off the leg and other smaller holes on each side.

After everything was taped up, I shot the nose wheel cover and surrounding avionics bay area with some self etching primer.

After the primer cured, I then shot the nose wheel cover and surrounding avionics bay with Duple-Color trunk paint (yes, folks, TRUNK paint . . . ha!).

I tried to lay the paint down in 2 lighter coats, but there were a number of odd angles where I had to get the can in closer then I wanted…. and it laid a much heavier, sloppier, wet coat in those areas.  Luckily this paint proved itself as the forgiving sort and self leveled as it dried.

It may be odd, but having grown up the son of a cabinet maker and carpenter, and doing a fair amount of wood working myself, I just couldn’t bring myself to cover up what I think is a really cool build aspect of these planes: the triangular Spruce stringers in the lower fuselage corners.  With the clear MGS that I use it looks like a bare wood strip down there and the hash cuts we make at intervals to install them is just a fun design feature in my book.  So… I covered each side’s stringer with tape to protect it from paint…. call me crazy! (I prefer “eccentric” . . . ha!).

I carefully pulled out all the cardboard blocks and removed the protective tape from all the wires, cables and components.  Yes, I’ll admit the majority of this painting endeavor is for simple cosmetic reasons.  There was some junky looking spots I had going on here, and for the most part I try to avoid adding weight with paint.  Also, as you can see by my stopping point on the sidewalls, it really is for the view that we see when peering into either leg hole.

Here I covered up some unsightly areas on the aft side of F22.

And here we have the left side foot heating vent duct with attached SCAT tubing.  I have to say, I’m really digging this paint color!

My decision in painting the sidewalls and some of the floor was a bit of scope creep in my initial task of painting the nose wheel cover (BTW, I couldn’t bring myself to remove the duct tape for the eventual anti-skid inserts off the floor just yet… it looked too good and I didn’t want to spoil it!).  Clearly (IMO anyway) I couldn’t NOT paint the insulated NB cover. Although an unpainted NB cover would have been an interesting discussion generator, it badly needed a good color of paint on it (again … IMO).

You can also see that my personal preference is to leave components their natural color if I can.  I see a lot of canards where once all the wiring and hardware is in, then it all gets blanketed with a coat of paint.  I think that style looks good as well, and serves to clean up & declutter the fuselage visually… I just prefer to preserve components sans paint if I can.

With the USB charger bracket and surrounding area finished to paint, I decided to go ahead and quickly install the USB charger port in its bracket and connect the wires.

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Project Update

Hey Guys,  

Well, it’s coming up on about 6 weeks since I’ve been back on the build.  Made some decent progress on a lot of smaller tasks, and hope to be transitioning into some of the bigger airframe component builds here soon.

First off, I’ve been slowly organizing some of the info on my build log.  Essentially adding menus –such as Canopy Latch Hardware under the Chapter 18 – Canopy– in attempt to avoid having all chapter info lumped under one big page. Unfortunately, one of my last WordPress updates (I think is the culprit) reformatted my pics so they’re much larger in size, and thus have turned sideways to fit on various pages.  I try to update them a few at a time, but honestly this won’t be fixed until after this project is a true airplane.

While awaiting (initially) on some hardware for the canopy latch, I regressed into some tooling up in what I considered critical tooling systems required for my highly esoterically-designed (e.g. “one off”) components.  Those tools being my 3D printer, the plasma cutting table, and the milling machine.  The good news is the 3D printer appears to be back online.  The plasma cutting table is what I consider at bare operational capacity… it has issues on which I’m dealing with Langmuir Systems.  The major mods to the mill (besides CNC) are complete, and I can slowly start bolting it back together and get it operational.

So I’ll be transitioning back onto the canopy (Chapter 18) once again first, then with the remaining big build finishes: the nose (Chapter 13), followed up by the strake build (Chapter 21), and then knocking out the winglet/rudder install (Chapter 20).  All in haphazard synergistic fashion of course!

Cheers!

  1. Chapter 18 – Mods kill us! Leave a reply
  2. Chapter 18 – My 12 steps . . . Leave a reply
  3. Chapter 18 – New Canopy Handle Leave a reply
  4. Chapter 13/18/22 – Bob is back! Leave a reply
  5. Tooling Up – Mill Tear Down Leave a reply
  6. Chapter 18 – All compromise… Leave a reply
  7. Chapter 18 – SC-1 Captive Bolt Leave a reply
  8. Chapter 18 – SC-1 Safety Catch Leave a reply
  9. Chapter 18 – Canopy Safety Catch Leave a reply