Initial Project Planning

Initial Project Planning

Trying the Long-EZ on for Size . . . 

6-9 March 2011 – After doing a fair amount of research I scrapped the idea of plunking down $19,000 for a Glastar kit in lieu of the Long-EZ Pay as You Build Plan!  I mean, besides, everyone knows that you SAVE money by building your own airplane!  HA!

Being a newbie, I had to know what I could cram on the instrument panel and what (or who) I could cram into the cockpit.

Initial Instrument Panel ViewInsrument Panel Mockup

 

 

 

 

 

But, being a project manager in my job instilled in me some tendencies to plan this thing out a bit.  I’ve seen too many real-world projects fall flat on their face due to failed planning.  And worse yet, I’ve seen havoc wreaked because a majority of project planning was based on assumptions and/or gut instincts.

Having only been around a Long-EZ when I was about 13 years old, I wasn’t exactly sure how the feel would be in the cockpit.  I had been to the airports around the area and hadn’t seen a Long-EZ, so I figured I would quickly build one myself! (Now that’s a plan!) I cut up some OSB flooring sheets to make a mock fuselage.  I didn’t have enough OSB, but after a quick trip to Home Depot I was able to finish my fuselage mockup.

LEZ Fuselage MockupLEZ Fuselage Mockup

My initial fuselage mockup was just a little too short (in length & height).  And more importantly, the stock width seemed just a little too narrow so I widened the fuselage mockup initially by 2 inches.

Initial Fuselage Mockup

Initial fuselage planning

The 2-inch wider fuselage was better, but it actually felt a little too wide.  I played around with different widths and plugged in the number for all the bulkheads to keep the width ratio the same and not mess with the fuselage’s shape.

IMAG0052

Of course to build the fuselage, I had get acquainted with the plans and their layout in fairly short order.

Initial Fuselage Mockup

Initial Fuselage Mockup

I finally settled on a front seat width of 1.4 inches wider than what the plans called for. This width would give me a little more elbow room, but not so much that I felt like I was going crazy on the widening effort.  After having a few buddies try out the back seat–and actually fitting!–I checked the block for the fuselage passing my size test!

So let’s build this puppy!

Recent Posts

Project Update

Hi Folks,

Ok, about 3 months back into the build.  My next update I’ll probably stop tracking this point.

The canopy is pretty much finished except for the external finishing of the frame, which I’ll do with the rest of the airframe micro finishing.  I do need to dial in the canopy latch handle a bit more, have a lot of ideas from a lot of folks (thanks all!) on how to do that, and am confident it will work fine when completed.

The nose and aft nose/avionics cover install is about a week from being finished, and I have now started my transition to the strake build (Chapter 21).  I will start the strakes while concurrently finishing up the nose using the glass cure cycles of each to work on the other.

I will be out of town for Thanksgiving, which will then transition into a trip out west to visit friends and family, then a few weeks on the build in December.  

That all being said, I hope to be done with the strakes by New Years.

Again, after the strakes the final big airframe assembly will be the winglet/rudder install (Chapter 20).  

 

  1. Chapter 13/21/22/24/26 – Seats, etc. Leave a reply
  2. Chapter 13/21/26 – Industrial Chic Leave a reply
  3. Chapter 26 – Initial Cockpit Paint Leave a reply
  4. Chapter 22/24 – Function over form Leave a reply
  5. Chapter 22/24 – Cockpit prep (cont.) Leave a reply
  6. Chapter 22/24 – Cockpit Paint Prep Leave a reply
  7. Chapter 21/22/24 – Strake openings cut Leave a reply
  8. Chapter 22/24 – GIB area ducts Leave a reply
  9. Chapter 18/22 – Heat duct installed Leave a reply